COOMALLO CREEK

 

Coomallo Creek

 

GPS 30 13 27.39 S 115 24 01.34 E

 

 

 

Toilets available Tables and / or seats and / or shelters provided Fire places or BBQs available Pets allowed on leash Walk trails Authorised parking facilities

 

 

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Coomallo Creek is a pleasant rest area located on Brand Highway just south of Jurien Road.

Facilities at the rest area include toilets, bins, seats, tables and information shelters.

Carnaby's Walk Trail starts at the rest area and is an easy 1.5 kiloemtre loop that takes you through woodland and up on heath along the side of a hill.

The best time to visit is in spring when the wildflowers are blooming but it is a pleasant walk in everything except very hot weather.

The walk includes the unusual zamia palms and the area, despite looking rather low and scrubby, supports and amazing 1500 species of plants. 111 species are found only in this region. The seeds of the zamia palms were once used as a food source by the Aboriginies but without proper preparation, they are poisonous.

The large cones break apart in February allowing access to the red seeds within. The seeds were buried, soaked in water and roasted to remove the toxins. They are said to have a flavour like that of tomatoes.

The white gums found at Coomallo Creek stand out in an otherwise treeless area.

The walk trail is named after Canaby's cockatoo, a large black parrot with white cheek patches. The birds can live up to 50 years and the population is estimated to be only 50,000 birds across the state. Just 15% of hatchlings are thought to survive their first year of life in areas that have been over cleared of native vegetation. The birds are currently listed as being endangered.

Many plants in the Kwongan heath and banksia woodlands are susceptible to Dieback and care should be taken not to move soil from one area to another. To reduce the spread of this fungus, stay on established tracks, try not to visit areas during times of heavy rainfall, clean vehicles and footwaer of mud and soil before entering bushland and do not enter areas signposted as containing dieback.

For more information visit Project Dieback.

 

 

 

Best time to visit:

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

 

 

 

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