SANDFORD ROCKS NATURE RESERVE

 

 

Sandford Rocks Nature Reserve - Western Australia

 

GPS 31 14 18 S 118 45 22 E

 

 

 

 

Pets prohibited Sight seeing area Walk trails Authorised parking facilities Day use site only - no camping

 

 

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Sandford Rocks is north east of Westonia and can be accessed via Boodarockin Road.

Pets are prohibited on the reserve and there are few facilities besides an information shelter and bird hide.

The black flanked rock wallaby is known to inhabit the reserve where boulders, rocky crevices and caves make an ideal refuge.

The wallabies have specially adapted feet that are covered with rough granulations for extra grip of rocky surfaces.

The wallabies used to be common but predation by foxes and cats as well as habitat loss have contributed to there now being just a few scattered and isolated populations in areas similar to Sandford Rocks.

Sandford Rocks is part of the Yilgarn Craton, a rock formation made up of granite that is estimated to be 2600 million years old.

This vast expanse of granite extends for thousands of metres below the surface and is seen when erosion allows higher formations to extend above the land's surface.

There are many hundreds of these outcrops scattered across the wheatbelt of Western Australia.

 

Wheatbelt rock formations
Some of the well known rock formation in the wheatbelt.

 

Before European settlement, rock outcrops were important to the Aboriginal people as a source of food, water and shelter.

Today the reserves protect an array of flora and fauna and it is important to leave things as you find them.

There is a fad today of placing rocks, one on top of the other to produce balanced rock structures. These may appear attractive but they disrupt the native habitats of small creatures like lizards and insects. PLEASE DO NOT disturb rocks in this way when visiting our bush land.

There is a 2.5km walk trail loop that leads across the granite outcrop to a natural amphitheatre.

 

 

Best time to visit:

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

 

 

 

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