Broomehill

 

 

BROOMEHILL

 

HEMA Map reference 74/G6

 

GPS 33 50 6 S 117 38 4 E

 

 

 

 

FIND ACCOMMODATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

STATISTICS

Distance from Perth

316 Km

Population

233

Average Rainfall

448.3mm

Mean Max Temp

C

Mean Min Temp

C

 

SERVICES

Police

08 9826 1102

Fire and Rescue

Unknown

Medical

Unknown

Visitor Centre

08 9825 1177

 

CARAVAN PARKS

Broomehill

08 9825 3555

 

HOTEL / MOTEL / B and B

Imperial Hotel

 

08 9824 1222

 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

 

 

 

DESCRIPTION

 

Broomehill is in the Great Southern region of Western Australia.

 

The area has traditionally relied on wheat and sheep farming but in recent years farmers have been diversifying into new areas to help improve income.

 

HISTORY

 

Settlement began in the 1860s when John Machail of Albany took up a pastoral lease near what was to become the settlement of Eticup.

 

Eticup was never surveyed despite at one time boasting a number of buildings.

 

With the arrival of the railway in 1889 a siding was constructed and as Eticup fell out of favour a new settlement started near the siding and the development of Broomehill began.

 

Broomehill is the second town in W.A. named after Sir Frederick Napier Broome. Originally the name was separated, Broome Hill, but changed in 1959 to become Broomehill.

 

The road board district was excised from Kojonup in 1892 and the town was gazetted in 1897 (another source says 1894) but 1889 is still celebrated as the founding date by local residents.

 

A police station was established in 1892 and following the discovery of gold at Coolgardie in 1893, John Holland blazed a trail that became known as Holland's Track (what imagination!). Prospectors travelled to Broomehill by train and then began the arduous 450km trek to the goldfields on foot.

 

The Holland Track has today been mainly overtaken by farmland but several now unconnected parts of the original track can still be followed via wheat belt roads through the area. The eastern part of the Holland Track still passes through virgin bushland out past the Rabbit Proof Fence. This route can be covered by the following strip maps - part of a heritage trail opened to travellers in 1993.

 

No fuel or water is available between Hyden and Coolgardie, so you must carry enough to safely travel at least 360km. To have enough time to explore the attractions along the track, allow at least three days. The trip is probably best done in spring when the wildflowers are at their best and temperatures are still low. Rain can make the track almost impassable so it is best tackled in dry weather.

 

TALL TALES AND TRUE

 

Pigs Might Fly

 

Mrs. T. Norrish. Early Days Vol 3.

 

'Eaglehawks were very plentiful at first. They carried off lambs and even attacked ewes at times. One day I heard a commotion at the pig sty and ran out to see an eagle carrying away a young pig. I shouted to the men and my husband shot the bird through the head as he was balancing himself on a limb. It fell with the pig to the ground. The latter was none the worse for its rise or fall, though it carried the marks of the eagle's claws all its life. This proves the truth of the prophecy that pigs might fly.'

 

MAP

 

 

OTHER INFORMATION

 

ATTRACTIONS

 

St. Elizabeth's church, Wadjekanup Bridge, Hayfield Reserve, Boot Rock.

 

BUILDINGS OF NOTE

 

Jones Building.

 

ELECTORAL ZONES

 

State : Wagin

Federal : O'Connor

 

OTHER INFO.

 

Postcode : 6318

Local Government : Shire of Broomehill-Tambellup

 

PHOTOS

Click on a thumbnail to see full sized picture.

 

 

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