CAPE PERON

Also known as Point Peron

 

Cape Peron - Western Australia

 

GPS 32 16 16 S 115 41 14 E

 

 

 

 

Pets allowed on leash Swimming allowed Fishing allowed (some sites may require a freshwater license.) Sight seeing area Push bike trails Walk trails Day use site only - no camping

 

 

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Cape Peron (or Point Peron as it is commonly known) is a rocky peninsula located just west of the coastal town of Rockingham.

The coastline of the cape varies between jagged limestone and sandy sheltered bays. It is a popular place to walk and for water based activities such as kayaking, fishing, swimming, snorkeling and boating.

There are some old military coastal defense buildings scattered around the cape with some hidden away while others stand out on the skyline.

Another Cape Peron can be found several hundred kilometres north at Shark Bay and both capes are named after Fremchman, François Péron. Peron co-wrote the exploration journals when the exploration leader Nicolas Baudin died and as he re-wrote the details, he also managed to insert his own name on many of the natural features that the expedition had encountered.

Be aware that Blue Ring Octopus inhabit the reefs here and that they should never be handled.

In 1964 Cape Peron was transferred from the Commonwealth to the State on the condition that it was to remain in its natural state and that Private Industrial, Commercial or Residential Development would not take place there.

Clashing with these conditions has been the proposal to turn 40 ha of the area into a marina and canal residential development. This has been strongly resisted by the local community.

Large sections of the cape are made of limestone cliffs. These can collapse without warning, so it is important to stay back from overhanging edges and not to climb into areas where there is a risk of collapse. As with all rocky coastal areas, care needs to be taken.

 

 

 

 

Best time to visit:

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

 

 

 

 

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