Salmon Gums Hotel
(C) Don Copley

 

 

SALMON GUMS

 

GPS 32 58 57 S 121 38 38 E

 

 

 

 

FIND ACCOMMODATION

 

Norseman

Nearby Towns

Gibson

 

 

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STATISTICS

Distance from Perth

822 Km

Population

160

Average Rainfall

341.2mm

Mean Max Temp

23.5C

Mean Min Temp

9.9C

 

SERVICES

Police

Esperance

Fire and Rescue

Esperance

Medical

Esperance

Visitor Centre

Esperance

 

CARAVAN PARKS

Community

0467 880 443

 

HOTEL / MOTEL / B and B

Hotel

08 9078 5040

 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

 

 

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DESCRIPTION

 

The small town of Salmon Gums is located roughly half way between Esperance and Norseman.

Originally a supply depot for miners on their way to the goldfields, Salmon Gums was later part of an unsuccessful attempt to open up farming in the region.

The name is descriptive and refers to eucalyptus trees (Eucalyptus salmonophloia) with smooth salmon coloured bark that are found in the area.

There is a small community caravan park available for travellers.

 

HISTORY

 

Land for a town site was set aside in 1912 when planning for a railway between Esperance and Norseman was under way. The railway took until the mid 1920s to complete and the town site was gazetted in 1925.

An agricultural research station was established in the area and it was found that soils in the area were deficient in phosphorus, copper and zinc.

Post World War One the area was designated for 'soldier settlers' but like many locations in the south that were included in this scheme, the land was marginal in terms of rainfall and poor soils meant that many farms failed. It was not until super phosphate and other essential elements were readily available to farmers, that the area became more successful for farming.

It was not until the 1960s when more modern farming techniques became available that the area began to prosper.

In 2001 plans were developed to mine a lignite deposit in the area but due to financial pressures this project was suspended in 2009.

In 2010 some test drilling by Triton Minerals Ltd. revealed a gold deposit that was then named Lady Penryhn Prospect.

The area suffered from drought conditions leading up to the declaration by the State Government that it had officially run out of water in 2011. 23 million litres of water was carted in to the area at a cost of $500,000. The rains returned in 2013 in sufficient quantity to allow the declaration of water deficiency to be lifted.

On May 20th 2013 an iron ore train derailed near Salmon Gums. The railway line was closed for 5 days but it took much longer to remove the damaged ore wagons.

 

TALL TALES AND TRUE

 

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MAP

 

 

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OTHER INFORMATION

 

ATTRACTIONS

 

Unknown.

 

BUILDINGS OF NOTE

 

Unknown.

 

ELECTORAL ZONES

 

State : Eyre

Federal : O'Connor

 

OTHER INFO.

 

Postcode : 6445

Local Government : Shire of Esperance

 

PHOTOS

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