SHIP WRECKS

 

Wreck of the Carbet Castle near Bunbury

 

 

 

 

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The waters of Western Australia are littered with the wrecks of ships that ran afoul of bad weather, reefs, rocks and plain poor seamanship.

It is estimated that over 1200 ships have foundered in West Australian waters since the 1600s. Many of these were salvaged or broken up for scrap, but close to 750 still lie undiscovered on the sea bed.

In the early days many losses were due to poor or non-existent charts and a lack of lighthouses warning of marine hazards.

Modern technology is no guarantee of safety as ships of all types are still lost along our long and dangerous coast.

The two areas with the highest number of wrecks are around Fremantle and Rottnest Island with over 120 recorded sinkings and Broome with 108 ships recorded as being sunk.

In 1874 a Royal Commission was held into the number and causes of shipwrecks and the following results were obtained:

1. Losses due to unseaworthiness of vessels 5%
2. Weather and circumstances beyond human control 30.5%
3. Drunkenness, ignorance and incompetence 65.5%

For a list of ship wrecks in West Australian waters visit : Western Australia - Shipwrecks

 

Ships lost between 1890-1900

Year

Ships Lost

Lives Lost

1890

12

1

1891

5

4

1892

7

0

1893

2

3

1894

3

0

1895

3

0

1896

4

3

1897

15

2

1898

24

0

1899

24

41

1900

23

7

 

Related Pages:
Ship Arrivals | HMAS Sydney | HMS Challenger | HMS Success

 

 

 

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